Mobile Workflow – Part 2

Editing Your Masterpieces On The Go

We’ve managed to get our images from camera to our mobile device; see part 1 for all that good stuff.  From this point onwards I can only really talk iOS, I don’t use Android and I don’t feel qualified to talk to you about it.

On iOS we have literally hundreds of apps we can choose from to manipulate, publish and share the photos.  Here’s a screen grab from the Photography folder on my iPad, I think I’ve actually shown a lot of restraint.

Screen grab from an iPad
The Photography Folder on my iPad

OK I will confess I also have another folder full of Adobe apps and I have Snapseed on the Dock.

Where to Start From?

The native Photos app on iOS is a very powerful starting point.  From here you can do all the basic edits, straighten the horizon, tweak saturation, contrast etc.  Additionally a number of other apps plug into Photos and you dip into them to further tweak and adjust your image.

Screen grab of iPad Photos app
Editing an Image with Photos on iOS

Whilst this is unquestionably powerful, it can be something of a double edged sword.  If I start off by going down this road, I inevitably stay in the Photos app ecosystem and not everything plays in there.

So What are the Alternatives?

As a Creative Cloud subscriber, I also get to use Lightroom CC on my iPad.  This is more of a full on digital assets management (DAM) and includes more “professional” features. Syncing with your Lightroom library in the cloud, RAW support, integration with Photoshop Fix for advanced healing and retouching and so on.

The whole thing is very full featured and very powerful, if anything it is possibly a case of overkill.  If I needed the features on offer in Lightroom CC I think I would have a laptop with me.  These are the kinds of features I look for when I am doing a full on commercial shoot, when I will have literally hundreds of images.  I just can’t see myself uploading them all to my iPad.  Sure, I use it for the occasional more serious edit, but it means importing the image into the DAM and it is just not as convenient as the native Photos app.  Obviously your mileage may vary, I may be just too set in my ways.  Let me know.

When it comes to something more akin to a full Photoshop/Gimp experience you have Affinity Photo.  I have barely scratched the surface of this winner of the Apple App of the Year 2017.  I can only liken it to holding Photoshop/Gimp in your hands, pair it with an [amazon_textlink asin=’B0764RK3HH|B07B4LJ6Z1′ text=’Apple Pencil’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’fineartx-21|fineartx-20′ marketplace=’UK|US’ link_id=’62d2e532-2644-11e8-91fd-b765dd6493a3′] and you have a game changing photo editing experience.  To call it an app seems to be selling it short.

Affinity Photo mobile photo editing application
Editing an image in Affinity Photo on an iPad Pro

 

What do I Use?

You want to know what is my go to app for editing on the move?  It doesn’t do Fuji X Trans RAW (though wider RAW support is there, so hopefully it is coming) and it doesn’t integrate with the Photos app.  However, it is fast, very full featured and contains lots of the magic Google acquired when it bought the Nik Collection.  Yes, my favourite photo editing app is Snapseed and it is available on iOS and Android and it is free.

Snapseed on a mobile device
Editing an image in Snapseed on an iPad

I can only suggest you try it, if you haven’t yet, come on you have nothing to lose.  For me this is the perfect blend of accessible quick fixes and very powerful photo editing features – tonal contrast anyone?

I am painfully aware that I have left out literally hundreds of apps, what is your go to app?  Let me know in the comments section.

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